A blog about British comfort food and more

All wrapped up – how the sandwich came to be

March 21, 2014 0 Comments Blog gobrit by Hook

fish_sandwichBet you did not know that John Montagu, better known as the 4th Earl of Sandwich, was credited with having created one of the most popular snacks and convenient anytime meals available in the world today. Anecdotally, the 4th Earl of Sandwich was rather fond of the gaming tables, and found himself in the middle of a particularly engrossing card game. Rather than leave play, he asked one of his servants to bring him some meat between two slices of bread or toast. A slightly less well-known story suggests it was work, not play, that made the Earl not want to leave his desk – but whatever the reason, his peers thought this mode of food was an excellent idea and began copying the concept. Before long, the sandwich had really caught on.

If you feel like trying a new twist on one of the world’s favorite snacks, then go brit! has some fantastic options for you. Stick with the traditional, with a filling chip butty – butty being an English slang word for sandwich, especially if the filling is comfort food like chips or bacon. Enjoy a filling shellfish option, like battered softshell or jumbo lump crabcake; go for the rustic taste of chargrilled chicken, or get a little more adventurous with Broiled Cajun Mahi or fried fish tacos in the Tube. Alternatively, head over to the East India Dock with tandoori chicken tacos. Or give battered fish a new spin with the splendid Codfather sandwich, served with crunchy coleslaw.

Whatever sandwich you choose, next time you bite into that ultra-convenient mini-meal, spare a thought for the erstwhile Earl of Sandwich, and rest assured you’re in the very best of company.

Tea, sympathy and, er, small beer?

February 23, 2014 0 Comments Blog gobrit by Hook

pints_of_beerA good, hot cup of tea — it's as British as, well, fish and chips (and a great accompaniment). Although tea is known to have been a favourite beverage of the Chinese for thousands of years, it wasn't until around 1657 that it was first introduced to England – in, of all places, a coffee house.

Tea was originally so expensive only the rich could enjoy it. It wasn't  until the middle of the 18th century that it became cheap enough for ordinary people to drink. Now, it's a ritual several times a day in offices, homes, meeting places, and even many British pubs.

Tea hasn't always been the favourite drink it is today though. For many centuries, ordinary British folk drank beer with their meals, often called small beer. The history of beer also dates back many thousands of years. Typical British beers tend towards the darker end, and are usually served at cellar temperature, around 10-14 degrees C (50-57F). Many beers have a mix of subtle flavours that would be lost if served colder than this.

At go brit!, beer is used to give the crispy batter that special extra kick and crispy texture. When cooked quickly at a high temperature, beer batter is unbeatable at sealing in food – most of the heat goes into the actual batter, while inside the fish simmers gently. There's sure to be something to tempt you from the menu – whether it's the beer battered fish, shrimp, crab balls, softshell crab, beer battered sausages and breast of chicken. If you're dining in, you can also enjoy a choice of British beers to drink with your meal. Tea, hot or iced, is available to both takeaway and dining in customers.

Of course, if you'd rather quench your thirst with water, root beer, coffee, fruit juice, or a soft drink, those options are also on offer. Come enjoy a beer at go brit! and a jolly good time.

Time to come out of your shell

December 23, 2013 0 Comments Blog gobrit by Hook

beer-battered shrimpAlthough fish and chips are still the most popular takeaway dish in the UK, recently shellfish have grown in popularity as a menu choice. Warm-water prawns are now the fifth most popular seafood option in the UK, with cold-water prawns in sixth place, making them the most popular shellfish overall. Mussels, crabsticks, crab and scallops also make it into the top twenty – and like all seafood, they're packed with vitamins and minerals.

At go brit! you can enjoy a wide range of delicious shellfish options from the menu – whether it's the tasty clam chowder soup or a grilled shrimp Caesar to start; or ease yourself in gently with a crab cake Caesar. If you'd rather go straight for the great a-la-carte choices, then coconut shrimp combines a cool, sweet tropical flavour with tender shrimp and sweet and spicy chilli dipping sauce. If, however, you firmly believe that seafood isn't really seafood unless it's covered in crispy, golden, deep fried batter, then beer battered jumbo shrimp, crab balls or soft-shell crab will be just right for you. If you're feeling a little more adventurous, opt for yummy clam strips or fried oysters with cocktail sauce.

The flaky, melt-in-the-mouth texture of well-cooked seafood makes it a great menu choice for all ages. Many shellfish, including crab and oyster, are also high in Omega-3, great for heart health, calcium, zinc and selenium. So tuck in with relish, knowing that not only does it taste great, it's doing you a world of good too – whatever shellfish you choose at go brit! in Lewes.

Sticky toffee pudding's massive appeal revealed

October 01, 2013 0 Comments Blog gobrit by Administrator

photo(4)Sticky. Toffee. Pudding. Just those three words on their own are enough to make most English people's mouths water. Many British chefs claim to have invented the iconic dessert, but most sources credit a hotel in the Lake District in 1960.

We're proud to say that here in the First State, we've got the top billing on this pudding. So why do we all love it so much?

It's comforting. Sticky toffee pudding harks back to the more traditional sorts of English puddings, such as "jam roly poly." Consider it a taste of yesteryear. Sticky toffee pudding is served hot, and on a cold day, it's the perfect after, as we say in England, to a meal.

It's stodgy, gooey and sinfully good. Enjoy it with cream, custard or ice cream - or on its own. The combination of flavors and textures with the warm sauce and cream are heavenly and amazingly good in the raw with just the toffee sauce covering it.

It's original. No matter the recipe, sticky toffee pudding tastes like nothing you've ever had before. In some places, fruit is added to the mixture; traditionally dates are used, but prunes are an alternative. Some cooks make little individual puddings; others prefer one larger pudding to divide among guests.

Whether you're looking for a perfect dessert for a small dinner gathering or an office party, you'll make a huge hit with our takeout pudding. We offer pan sizes of the pudding that start at six servings for $26 and 12 servings for $50.

Red, white and seafood!

August 05, 2013 0 Comments Blog gobrit by Hook

interior_gobrit

Although fish and chips are still the most popular takeaway dish in the UK, recently shellfish have grown in popularity as a menu choice. Warm-water prawns are now the fifth most popular seafood option in the UK, with cold-water prawns in sixth place, making them the most popular shellfish overall. Mussels, crabsticks, crab and scallops also make it into the top twenty – and like all seafood, they're packed with vitamins and minerals.

At go brit! you can enjoy a wide range of delicious shellfish options from the menu – whether it's the tasty clam chowder soup or a grilled shrimp Caesar to start; or ease yourself in gently with a crab cake Caesar. If you'd rather go straight for the great a-la-carte choices, then coconut shrimp combines a cool, sweet tropical flavour with tender shrimp and sweet and spicy chilli dipping sauce. If, however, you firmly believe that seafood isn't really seafood unless it's covered in crispy, golden, deep fried batter, then beer battered jumbo shrimp, crab balls or soft-shell crab will be just right for you. If you're feeling a little more adventurous, opt for yummy clam strips or fried oysters with cocktail sauce.

The flaky, melt-in-the-mouth texture of well-cooked seafood makes it a great menu choice for all ages. Many shellfish, including crab and oyster, are also high in Omega-3, great for heart health, calcium, zinc and selenium. So tuck in with relish, knowing that not only does it taste great, it's doing you a world of good too – whatever shellfish you choose at go brit! in Lewes.

Celebrate the much-anticipated arrival of the little Prince

July 25, 2013 0 Comments Blog gobrit by Hook

Prince_at_go_britWhat a week! News about the infant son of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge had everyone in Delaware and beyond more enthralled with our British culture. Clients new and old, even royal ones, have stopped by to celebrate with us the arrival of His Royal Highness Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge. We couldn't be happier.

 

As a token of our appreciation, we're inviting everyone to register for a drawing. You could win a Royal Feast - in British style, no less - for up to 20 people. Stop by at go fish! or go brit! to register your name before July 31. 

New study finds only 390 calories in a portion of our fish and chips

June 03, 2013 1 Comments Blog gobrit by Hook

fish_batterForget the fish tale about fried food. Our fish and chips are a healthy option; and we have proof!

A third-party nutrition analysis provider, MenuTrinfo, has determined that a serving of our famous beer-battered fish and chips has a total of 390 calories and 30 grams of protein. Very little oil gets into the fish because of our quick frying method. Plus, we use fresh potatoes and unprocessed fish to make the dish even more wholesome.

Across the pond, the British Nutrition Foundation found that an average portion of fish and chips contains almost three times less fat (20.6%) than an equivalent portion of chicken tikka masala and pilau rice (British favorites).

To keep fish and chips healthy, the trick is to pass over the tartar sauce (1.5 ounces of tartar contains 210 calories). Stick to the traditional use of English malt vinegar, which has zero calories! Another healthy alternative is our beer-battered fish and Caesar salad.

We've long known that fish is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids. Remember that a serving of fish and chips contains other vitamins and minerals, including B6 and B12, vitamin C, iron, calcium, and phosphorous. And consuming white fish is known to reduce the risk of having heart attacks and strokes.

So enjoy and do as the British do:indulge in malt vinegar with your fish and chips

Fish and chip shops have a long and delicious history

May 27, 2013 0 Comments Blog gobrit by Hook

Fish_n_Chips

There are many reasons why the combination of fish and chips is so popular in the UK... let us count the ways! Some are historical, some are financial and some are just plain practical.

The historical reasons are tied up with the old Roman Catholic tradition of not eating meat on a Friday, especially in Lent. There are also financial and practical reasons why "fish and chips" is so popular in the UK. As an island nation, fish has always been extremely important, particularly in areas on the edge. These include Scotland, Cornwall, and the counties that border the wild North Sea, traditionally source of some of the very best cod, haddock and plaice.

Potatoes, relatively easy to grow in the damp and fertile climate, have been popular for centuries as a cheap, nutritious food, whether boiled, mashed, roasted, or fried in Irish potato shops in the nineteenth century.

Fried battered fish was invented by the Portuguese, and the Belgians claim they invented the chip, but their first happy union occurred in the UK in the mid 1800s. Legend says that an enterprising young Jewish lad called Joseph Malin first sold the two together. In 1896, Londoner Samuel Isaacs opened the first fish restaurant. During World War Two, fish and potatoes were amongst the very few foods not subject to rationing.

Ever since, they've continued to offer fantastic value for money. In a country where the weather is not exactly predictable, fish and chips are the ultimate in comfort food.

Comforting food that is sweeter than springtime

April 22, 2013 0 Comments Blog gobrit by Administrator

This year, the winter winds appear to be taking a little longer than usual to let the spring sunshine in. Thus nourishing, filling comfort food is still very much on the menu.


Many areas of Britain have their very own spring specials, ranging from slow-cooked leg of lamb and the fruity bara brith bread in Wales to hawthorn spring pudding in the southwest of England. Scallops and shellfish in general are another seasonal favorite, from Scotland to Cornwall. Freshly caught cold water cod is also at its very best in the spring – so tuck into your fish supper with a clear conscience.


Alternatively, help keep the spring chill out with a warming bowl of clam chowder, followed by seasonal best crabcakes, crab balls or crab dip. Sticking with shellfish, you’ll find the spicy mayo dipping sauce makes a perfect accompaniment to the clam strips on the go brit! menu. Or if you really can’t decide which shellfish to try first, opt for the crab stuffed shrimp.


As a great side to accompany your fish and chips, or as a light meal on their own, “spring greens” are essential to ward off any early sniffles. The description often means the first small, sweet cabbages of the season – or any nutritious green leaf. Go brit! can make sure you get your daily dose of vitamins with its healthy, wholesome starter of organic field greens.


Filling spring desserts help finish off a meal in style. Spring specialties in the UK include rhubarb crumble. Of course, it’s always the season for Sticky Toffee Pudding. At go brit! you can combine the best flavors from both sides of the Atlantic, with Key Lime Pie or Beer Battered Cheesecake. After a bracing turn along the Boardwalk, these yummy puds are just what you need to warm up – washed down, of course, with a steaming cup of hot tea.


So enjoy your spring menu, and before you know it, it’ll be time to enjoy a summer stroll along the seafront again.

You’ve got to love Friday Fryday!

March 25, 2013 0 Comments Blog gobrit by Administrator

There’s nothing nicer than a fish supper any day of the week, although traditionally fish and chips are the “dish of the day” on Fridays, especially Good Friday. But just where did this tradition start?

Many explanations exist. Friday is named after the Old Norse God Freya, whose symbol was a fish. The early Christians also took the fish as their symbol, often scratched into bricks or the dirt to let fellow worshipers know where to meet in safety and secrecy when practicing their faith openly was highly risky. Another theory suggests that fisherman often brought their catch into port on Fridays – meaning fish was at its very best that day.

In the Middle Ages, meat remained an expensive luxury for most ordinary folk, reserved for feast days or special occasions like weddings. More recently, when many people worked in manual jobs and were paid weekly, usually on a Friday, fish and chips were an affordable weekly treat.

With modern knowledge of nutrition, we now know fish is a much healthier source of protein than most red meat – fish is low in fat, high in nutrients. If fish isn’t your dish of choice, why not try crab cakes, fried shrimp or fried oysters – all just as good with crispy, golden chips.

Whatever the reason, on any given Friday, come out to go fish! or go brit! for your $5 Fish Sandwich (through late May) or a traditional Beer Battered Fish and Chips meal.